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> HORROR Movies, Books, Stories, Poems, Like/Dislike the mystery elements
Cleo_Serapis
post Oct 29 03, 10:10
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Hi! grinning.gif  devil.gif

One of my co-workers just saw yet another remake of "Texas Chainsaw Massacre) at the movies last weekend.

I don't know about you, but I find the most scary movies/books/poems/stories that I take a liking to are the ones where the 'mystery' is left to your own imagination.

Instead of seeing the blood and gore, I'd rather 'imagine it' for myself.

How about you?

~Cleo  Pharoah.gif


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"It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step into the Road, and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to." ~ J.R.R Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

Collaboration feeds innovation. In the spirit of workshopping, please revisit those threads you've critiqued to see if the author has incorporated your ideas, or requests further feedback from you. In addition, reciprocate with those who've responded to you in kind.

"I believe it is the act of remembrance, long after our bones have turned to dust, to be the true essence of an afterlife." ~ Lorraine M. Kanter

Nominate a poem for the InterBoard Poetry Competition by taking into careful consideration those poems you feel would best represent Mosaic Musings. For details, click into the IBPC nomination forum. Did that poem just captivate you? Nominate it for the Faery award today! If perfection of form allured your muse, propose the Crown Jewels award. For more information, click here!

"Worry looks around, Sorry looks back, Faith looks up." ~ Early detection can save your life.

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Guest__*
post Oct 29 03, 16:25
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Hey Lori,

I, for one, am with you.  I offer for example that terrible movie (personal opinion, of course) "The Blair Witch Project".

I didn't think the movie was very good, in fact it had a very foul odor about it.  And was the movie "scary"?  IMO, not one single moment of it.

BUT!!!

What my imagination came up with after the movie was over scared the crap out of me and gave me some very unhealthy nightmares.

No blood, no guts, (and truth be told, no story-line) but it ended up scaring me to death.

So while it was not a good movie in general, it was an excellent horror movie.

Why?

Because the only person that could come up with the scariest possible ending for that movie is yourself.  You and only you know exactly what scares you the most.  Too many movies these days take that element out of it.

Dan
 
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Guest_Jox_*
post Oct 29 03, 17:09
Post #3





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Hi,

Some background on my personal view of films...

I am not a film fan at all. We only ever go to the cinema to see the latest James Bond film - and we even opted out of the latest "Die Another Day" because reports said it was too loud. Our DVD collection is overwhelmingly of tv series, rather than films per se. Moreover, those films that I do like are almost all British - I hate most American films. This is an unusual personal cultural thing; most Brits love most American films. For an American film to appeal to me it has to work much harder than a British film. Partly this is also American films being too violent with gun battles; the usual American re-working of the Cowboy/Indian or Cops/Robbers thing. (There you are! I love James Bond and that always has lots of gun battles - but it is British so I'm more tolerant. Hypocrisy is great!).

This same analysis continues into horror films. I adore Hammer Horrors (1960-70s UK somewhat campish horror films). I have never watched “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” - nor would I with a title like that.  I have never seen “The Blair Witch Project” - I gave it a few minutes when a tv station showed it but was bored so switched off. “Psycho” also bored me in the first few minutes - but I also saw a little of the shower scene and switched off. That was murder, not horror to me.

I suppose that I regard horror films as films which have suspenseful plots and a menacing supernatural element. To that end, I regard the “Alien” films as horror (they are, also sci-fi of course). I did not like them either because they simply degenerated into the American shooting sessions yet again. Why do so many American films have bloody gun battles which are supposed to decide the moral difference between black and white? And why is it always a simplistic good/bad fight anyway? British films are not immune from this but I think that generally there is a different psychology at work... maybe an acceptance that grey (not black nor white) is the norm. Fewer mega gun battles - and seldom for their own sake and maybe (though I can think of many exceptions) another pet hate of mine - the victimisation of the vulnerable woman.

For the record, some of the horror films which I do like best are:

Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Frances Ford Coppola) - USA / UK (1990s)
Mary Shelly’s Francenstein (Kenneth Brannagh) - UK (1990s)
Witchfinder General - UK (1970s)
The Wicker Man - UK (1970s)

Very few guns; not too much blood. All have violence to some degree.

What I do like about some of these is their sympathy for the underdog. Dracula is shown as a lover, The Monster as a tragic figure.

If only Hollywood could put away the guns but still make interesting films. (Blair Witch with flair!)

PS "Harvey" is one of the best films ever made. The Star Wars and Star Trek series are excellent - and all American (some with guns).
 
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Cleo_Serapis
post Oct 29 03, 17:12
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Referred By:Imhotep



Excellent point Dan!  :read: Idea.gif

I've never seen BWP, but heard the basics as you've already mentioned.

I love a good CREEPY book, it gives me the same impression where I am left to wonder and have that 'afterthought' lingering through my mind. COOL!  :cool:  :devil:  :speechless:

We should do a chaos about that! pumpkin.gif

Thanks!
~Cleo  :pharoah:


·······IPB·······

"It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step into the Road, and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to." ~ J.R.R Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

Collaboration feeds innovation. In the spirit of workshopping, please revisit those threads you've critiqued to see if the author has incorporated your ideas, or requests further feedback from you. In addition, reciprocate with those who've responded to you in kind.

"I believe it is the act of remembrance, long after our bones have turned to dust, to be the true essence of an afterlife." ~ Lorraine M. Kanter

Nominate a poem for the InterBoard Poetry Competition by taking into careful consideration those poems you feel would best represent Mosaic Musings. For details, click into the IBPC nomination forum. Did that poem just captivate you? Nominate it for the Faery award today! If perfection of form allured your muse, propose the Crown Jewels award. For more information, click here!

"Worry looks around, Sorry looks back, Faith looks up." ~ Early detection can save your life.

MM Award Winner
 
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Guest__*
post Oct 29 03, 20:09
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Jox,

I find it very interesting that you consider the "Alien" movies as horror movies (though I understand your point ).

Out of curiosity, would you consider "The Lord of the Rings" (novels or movies) to be horror?  IMO, they are some of the most suspenseful works ever done.  And they certainly have what I would call a "menacing supernatural element".

Of course, it's been my experience that the very best novels, movies, etc., can't really be put in any "category".

PS- I'm also a big James Bond fan.  




Lori,

Would that be considered "chaotic chaos"?
 
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Guest_Jox_*
post Oct 30 03, 04:53
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Hi Dan,

I find it very interesting that you consider the "Alien" movies as horror movies (though I understand your point ).

Well, creatures emerging from people's bodies is somewhat cliche now - but when "Alien" first came out it was very horriffic. Aside: Have you ever seen the tv sit com series "Red Dwarf" It satirises lots of Sci-Fi including "Star Trek" and "Alien."

Out of curiosity, would you consider "The Lord of the Rings" (novels or movies) to be horror?  IMO, they are some of the most suspenseful works ever done.  And they certainly have what I would call a "menacing supernatural element".

Good point. I don't think I would but only because I did not consider it menacing. You are quite right: it was intended to be menacing but I just hated the film so I would have been quite content to see all the cast wiped out. I suppose one must have some sympathy with the endangered characters.

I ought to say this is a British film - so not only some American ones I hate! (Indeed recent British films I hate include "Trainspotting" and "The Full Monty".)

"Lord of The Rings" - The film was well-made and Sir Ian McKellen and others are excellent actors. My problem is the genre. I cannot relate to mystical / mythical stuff alone. I don't mind it being an element in productions / books but it if becomes the raison d'etre then it's not the genre for me. (We only watched Lord of The Rings because a friend "insisted" we borrow his DVD and assured us we'd like it. We won't watch the next ones in the series.) By contrast, "Star Wars" has all those mythological / pseudo religious elements in it too but is saved, for me, by other aspects. (Plus my favourite actor - the late Sir Alec Guinness). I would never read "Star Wars" books though - the genre would not appeal; it is everything else which the films bring that I do  appreciate.

Also! (Not being a film fan) a film must have humour in for me to like it. Even the darkest films need humour - and, ideally, irony should be present.

So, I say to all again, this is a very personal view. Can I just mention "Harvey" (1950) again... American and one of the best films of all time. James Stewart was an excellent supporting actor and Harvey was magnificent. For your info...

Harvey is a pooka in the form of an invisible six-feet tall white rabbit. He never becomes visible in the film (which means it is a very hard acting role which he undertakes brilliantly). However, Elwood P Doud (Stewart's character) does have a painting of the two of them made - so one can see he (Harvey) is a very handsome beast indeed. Doud is committed to a mental hospital because other humans are stupid and blind. Eventually, however, there is a happy ending. (And Stewart and Harvey are, jointly, my second favourite actors). Now why cannot Hollywood produce such pictures any more. And no schmaltz!

"Harvey" Review

Of course, it's been my experience that the very best novels, movies, etc., can't really be put in any "category".

PS- I'm also a big James Bond fan.

Good man! What is your favourite film in the series?
 
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Guest__*
post Oct 30 03, 09:21
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Jox,

It would have to be a tie between "Goldfinger" and "Octopussy".

As for "Lord of the Rings" (and I'm speaking strictly from a viewpoint of the novels, the movies pale in comparison), the first time I read it I was 10 years old and they scared me half to death.  To this day the novels' portrayal of the Ringwraiths and of Sauron himself sends shivers down my spine.  I must admit, however, that we are on opposite ends of the spectrum; fantasy (NOT sci-fi, they are two different genres, IMO) has become nearly the only thing I will read in the last few years.

But getting back to films, I agree that most films just aren't very good, especially in the horror genre.  It's just so hard to make fear a real and tangible thing.  I think it's much easier for a novelist to create a "horror" story because so much is left to reader's imagination.  Which is why I pointed out the "Blair Witch" (and I repeat, IMO it's a terrible movie).  The possible fate of the characters is left entirely to what the viewers' own minds come up with.  

As for comedy, give me British comedy over American anytime.  I can't stand American comedy films.  The last good one I saw was "Sneakers" and it's actually more of an action/drama film.  That's been probably 12 years ago.  Now give me Monty Python, give me Eddie Izzard, but what ever you do don't give me Steve Martin.

I've heard of "Red Dwarf", but never had the opportunity to see it.

Dan
 
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Guest_Jox_*
post Oct 30 03, 13:09
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Dan, Hi

I agree that sci-fi and fantasy/myth are two different genres; didn't mean to indicate otherwise. Neither are really my thing but I do think that there have been some great sci-fi films / tv series on. Of course, in the end, it all boils down to the characters - believable? Likeable? etc etc.

I always intended to read JRRT's books but never have (to my shame) - I think I would far prefer them. And, yes, the scope for writers is greater than for film makers. But then again, film makers have a lot of toys they can employ to make things fun.

Bond - "Live and Let Die" followed by "Tomorrow Never Dies". I'm not at all keen on the books (some of which I have read). Mind you, "Goldfinger" and "Octopussy" are excellent, too.

Monty Python's Flying Circus, indeed. My all-time favourite comedy - closely followed by the radio series "The Goons" (1950s). (I am quite a big Steve Martin fan, too!). However, I'm afraid most British comedy is very very poor in comparisson. I wish I could raise the flag for British comedy these days, but I cannot. The US has been producing the most popular sit coms for Brits in recent years ("Cheers", "Friends", "Frasier", "Sex in the City" etc). One exception is "Red Dwarf". The film of the tv series is in production - but I always fear that. It is the tv series which was so good - hope you can see some of it.

Horror... Cleo you started something here!

J.
 
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Cleo_Serapis
post Oct 31 03, 20:18
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Referred By:Imhotep



QUOTE (Jox @ Oct. 29 2003, 17:09)
Hi,

Some background on my personal view of films...

I am not a film fan at all. We only ever go to the cinema to see the latest James Bond film - and we even opted out of the latest "Die Another Day" because reports said it was too loud. Our DVD collection is overwhelmingly of tv series, rather than films per se. Moreover, those films that I do like are almost all British - I hate most American films. This is an unusual personal cultural thing; most Brits love most American films. For an American film to appeal to me it has to work much harder than a British film. Partly this is also American films being too violent with gun battles; the usual American re-working of the Cowboy/Indian or Cops/Robbers thing. (There you are! I love James Bond and that always has lots of gun battles - but it is British so I'm more tolerant. Hypocrisy is great!).

This same analysis continues into horror films. I adore Hammer Horrors (1960-70s UK somewhat campish horror films). I have never watched “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” - nor would I with a title like that.  I have never seen “The Blair Witch Project” - I gave it a few minutes when a tv station showed it but was bored so switched off. “Psycho” also bored me in the first few minutes - but I also saw a little of the shower scene and switched off. That was murder, not horror to me.

I suppose that I regard horror films as films which have suspenseful plots and a menacing supernatural element. To that end, I regard the “Alien” films as horror (they are, also sci-fi of course). I did not like them either because they simply degenerated into the American shooting sessions yet again. Why do so many American films have bloody gun battles which are supposed to decide the moral difference between black and white? And why is it always a simplistic good/bad fight anyway? British films are not immune from this but I think that generally there is a different psychology at work... maybe an acceptance that grey (not black nor white) is the norm. Fewer mega gun battles - and seldom for their own sake and maybe (though I can think of many exceptions) another pet hate of mine - the victimisation of the vulnerable woman.

For the record, some of the horror films which I do like best are:

Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Frances Ford Coppola) - USA / UK (1990s)
Mary Shelly’s Francenstein (Kenneth Brannagh) - UK (1990s)
Witchfinder General - UK (1970s)
The Wicker Man - UK (1970s)

Very few guns; not too much blood. All have violence to some degree.

What I do like about some of these is their sympathy for the underdog. Dracula is shown as a lover, The Monster as a tragic figure.

If only Hollywood could put away the guns but still make interesting films. (Blair Witch with flair!)

PS "Harvey" is one of the best films ever made. The Star Wars and Star Trek series are excellent - and all American (some with guns).

Hey Magic Man!  laugh.gif

Now how did this post get in here without my knowing? I know, it must have been those servants tending to my every desire, leaving me 'in another world' during your posting! Hahahhahahahahha!  devil.gif

I pretty much like most genras of film. Some of my inspiration has been gained through the movie industry. Now...if I could just get us a famous producer/actor/director to come on over and indulge at the Mosaic, that would be fun!

Now - about Bond - Sean Connery! Need I say more!  lovie.gif  BEST Bond film Never Say Never Again. The trivia there is that Connery claimed he would never do another Bond film and then this one came along - oh well!  laugh.gif

We have a large collection of DVD's - X-Files, Stargate SG-1, and Star Trek TNG for series. Most others are movies of all genras.
My favorite Horror film: The Shining, for the gore element and the SCARE me to death element - and also "The Exorcist".

Good verses Evil is what most writers end up with. I love those 'twister endings' that no one expects. The ones where the good guy doesn't win, lol...Like "Alien" for example. I would classify that as Sci_FI myself more than Horror, but the ending makes one say, ":WHOA!" Is that thing in her?

Ahhh gotta love it!
Any Hitchcock film is classic HORROR/SUSPENSE! I love them all!


Bram Stoker'd Dracula rules! Interesting enough, I just watched a History Channel (or A & E, I forget) special about Mr Stoker. He spent like 8 years studying the Vampire lengend and myths from around the world prior to writing his novel. The play was a HUGE FLOP and he did with almost nothing.
My Hungarian blood loves to dabble in these kinds of things!

YEAH on teh Star Wars and TREK films - Wrath of Khan rules!

~Cleo  dance.gif


·······IPB·······

"It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step into the Road, and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to." ~ J.R.R Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

Collaboration feeds innovation. In the spirit of workshopping, please revisit those threads you've critiqued to see if the author has incorporated your ideas, or requests further feedback from you. In addition, reciprocate with those who've responded to you in kind.

"I believe it is the act of remembrance, long after our bones have turned to dust, to be the true essence of an afterlife." ~ Lorraine M. Kanter

Nominate a poem for the InterBoard Poetry Competition by taking into careful consideration those poems you feel would best represent Mosaic Musings. For details, click into the IBPC nomination forum. Did that poem just captivate you? Nominate it for the Faery award today! If perfection of form allured your muse, propose the Crown Jewels award. For more information, click here!

"Worry looks around, Sorry looks back, Faith looks up." ~ Early detection can save your life.

MM Award Winner
 
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Cleo_Serapis
post Oct 31 03, 20:21
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Referred By:Imhotep



QUOTE (Atlantis @ Oct. 29 2003, 20:09)
Jox,

I find it very interesting that you consider the "Alien" movies as horror movies (though I understand your point ).

Out of curiosity, would you consider "The Lord of the Rings" (novels or movies) to be horror?  IMO, they are some of the most suspenseful works ever done.  And they certainly have what I would call a "menacing supernatural element".

Of course, it's been my experience that the very best novels, movies, etc., can't really be put in any "category".

PS- I'm also a big James Bond fan.  




Lori,

Would that be considered "chaotic chaos"?

I LOVE the LOTR films!

I wouldn't consider them HORROR, rather Sci-Fi/Fantasy.

While there are some gore moments, the overall story is again, good verses evil.... LOVE IT!!!!! Can't wait for 'The Return of the King' next month!

All Bonds are Chaotic Chaos!  :cloud9:


·······IPB·······

"It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step into the Road, and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to." ~ J.R.R Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

Collaboration feeds innovation. In the spirit of workshopping, please revisit those threads you've critiqued to see if the author has incorporated your ideas, or requests further feedback from you. In addition, reciprocate with those who've responded to you in kind.

"I believe it is the act of remembrance, long after our bones have turned to dust, to be the true essence of an afterlife." ~ Lorraine M. Kanter

Nominate a poem for the InterBoard Poetry Competition by taking into careful consideration those poems you feel would best represent Mosaic Musings. For details, click into the IBPC nomination forum. Did that poem just captivate you? Nominate it for the Faery award today! If perfection of form allured your muse, propose the Crown Jewels award. For more information, click here!

"Worry looks around, Sorry looks back, Faith looks up." ~ Early detection can save your life.

MM Award Winner
 
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Cleo_Serapis
post Oct 31 03, 20:28
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Referred By:Imhotep



QUOTE (Atlantis @ Oct. 30 2003, 09:21)
As for comedy, give me British comedy over American anytime.  I can't stand American comedy films.  The last good one I saw was "Sneakers" and it's actually more of an action/drama film.  That's been probably 12 years ago.  Now give me Monty Python, give me Eddie Izzard, but what ever you do don't give me Steve Martin.

I've heard of "Red Dwarf", but never had the opportunity to see it.

Dan

It would have to be "Goldfinger" !!! Viking.gif

Most of those hack 'em up movies don't win Oscars so I must agree Dan!

SAve for The Shining - AWESOME!

MONTY PYTHON rules!

Holy Grail or Meaning of Life? Tough Choice! We used to chant the lines from these movies in between 9-1-1 calls on my old part time EMT job eons ago. British humor rules!


·······IPB·······

"It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step into the Road, and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to." ~ J.R.R Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

Collaboration feeds innovation. In the spirit of workshopping, please revisit those threads you've critiqued to see if the author has incorporated your ideas, or requests further feedback from you. In addition, reciprocate with those who've responded to you in kind.

"I believe it is the act of remembrance, long after our bones have turned to dust, to be the true essence of an afterlife." ~ Lorraine M. Kanter

Nominate a poem for the InterBoard Poetry Competition by taking into careful consideration those poems you feel would best represent Mosaic Musings. For details, click into the IBPC nomination forum. Did that poem just captivate you? Nominate it for the Faery award today! If perfection of form allured your muse, propose the Crown Jewels award. For more information, click here!

"Worry looks around, Sorry looks back, Faith looks up." ~ Early detection can save your life.

MM Award Winner
 
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Guest_Jox_*
post Oct 31 03, 20:48
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Cleo,

Interesting...

Star Trek - Khan - I actually think that is both sci-fi and horror. That menace of Khan and his pet nasty which is introduces are most horrific. (Excellent film - agreed).

Bond - "Never Say Never" is not actually one of the official Bond films. It was not made by the Broccolis nor the usual team. Seeing that you and I seem to be opposites in taste it's not surprising that I think it is one of the worst Bond films - but not the worst (one of Dalton's is very violent). Never Say Never generated a big court case and the producers were banned from using the 007 logo, music or intro graphics. It was a spoiler film against Live and Let Die. Connery was ok but the production seemed "ordinary" - not Bond and the music was missing, those intro titles which are so important and I could not stand Atkinson's character

There have been twenty official Bond films (007) starting with Dr No and going through (so far) to Die Another Day. The other Bond film (Casino Royale starring David Niven as Bond) was made before or about the same time as the official series got underway.

Sir Sean Connary finished with one film (can't remember which). Then they made On Her Majesty's Secret Service with the Australian model, George Lazenby. It was an excellent film in many ways but the actor only lasted the one film. Sir Sean came back for "Diamonds Are Forever", centred around Las Vegas. Then he left and Sir Roger Moore came in. Moore did the most films (7) unless one adds "Never Say Never" to Sir Sean's - in which case he made seven, too.

After Sir Roger we had Timothy Dalton. A very good actor but unsuited for Bond. I shall also blame the producers for making the films too violent at that time. (I have extra liking for Dalton because he and I are from the same county - but he's never invited me for tea).

Brosnan has revived the series brilliantly and makes an excellent Bond. My fav? Sir Roger or Brosnan. But Sir Sean is excellent, too.

I know almost all film lovers love Hitchcock. But I'm no film lover and the only film of his which I do like is "The 39 Steps" - (espionage again).

Bram Stoker - yes interesting man. The book is excellent and so are many films (bust mostly for fun). The only film which captures anything of the Book is FF Copolla's.

Stoker also wrote the Lair of the White Worm - excellent camp horror film; have not read the book yet.

Stoker, an Irishman, did work in the theatre and wished to be as successful as the people he worked for. Translyvania is part of Roumania (or do you mean you have Hungarian blood). Blood! That word! If you are Hungarian then a glass of Bull's Blood for you!

Lord of the Rings - just too mythy for me; too fantasy genre. Excellent acting; great New Zealand scenery but I just wished all the characters would die. No sympathy for any of them I'm afraid. We stuck it to the end and it was pretty, well acted but it just seemed pointless. I didn't even know what they were calling the sequel - though, with the enormous box office hit they had with the first one, I knew they would do another.

TTFN, J.
 
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Cleo_Serapis
post Nov 1 03, 09:53
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Referred By:Imhotep



QUOTE (Jox @ Oct. 31 2003, 20:48)
Cleo,

Interesting...

Star Trek - Khan - I actually think that is both sci-fi and horror. That menace of Khan and his pet nasty which is introduces are most horrific. (Excellent film - agreed).

Bond - "Never Say Never" is not actually one of the official Bond films. It was not made by the Broccolis nor the usual team. Seeing that you and I seem to be opposites in taste it's not surprising that I think it is one of the worst Bond films - but not the worst (one of Dalton's is very violent). Never Say Never generated a big court case and the producers were banned from using the 007 logo, music or intro graphics. It was a spoiler film against Live and Let Die. Connery was ok but the production seemed "ordinary" - not Bond and the music was missing, those intro titles which are so important and I could not stand Atkinson's character

There have been twenty official Bond films (007) starting with Dr No and going through (so far) to Die Another Day. The other Bond film (Casino Royale starring David Niven as Bond) was made before or about the same time as the official series got underway.

Sir Sean Connary finished with one film (can't remember which). Then they made On Her Majesty's Secret Service with the Australian model, George Lazenby. It was an excellent film in many ways but the actor only lasted the one film. Sir Sean came back for "Diamonds Are Forever", centred around Las Vegas. Then he left and Sir Roger Moore came in. Moore did the most films (7) unless one adds "Never Say Never" to Sir Sean's - in which case he made seven, too.

After Sir Roger we had Timothy Dalton. A very good actor but unsuited for Bond. I shall also blame the producers for making the films too violent at that time. (I have extra liking for Dalton because he and I are from the same county - but he's never invited me for tea).

Brosnan has revived the series brilliantly and makes an excellent Bond. My fav? Sir Roger or Brosnan. But Sir Sean is excellent, too.

I know almost all film lovers love Hitchcock. But I'm no film lover and the only film of his which I do like is "The 39 Steps" - (espionage again).

Bram Stoker - yes interesting man. The book is excellent and so are many films (bust mostly for fun). The only film which captures anything of the Book is FF Copolla's.

Stoker also wrote the Lair of the White Worm - excellent camp horror film; have not read the book yet.

Stoker, an Irishman, did work in the theatre and wished to be as successful as the people he worked for. Translyvania is part of Roumania (or do you mean you have Hungarian blood). Blood! That word! If you are Hungarian then a glass of Bull's Blood for you!

Lord of the Rings - just too mythy for me; too fantasy genre. Excellent acting; great New Zealand scenery but I just wished all the characters would die. No sympathy for any of them I'm afraid. We stuck it to the end and it was pretty, well acted but it just seemed pointless. I didn't even know what they were calling the sequel - though, with the enormous box office hit they had with the first one, I knew they would do another.

TTFN, J.

Best looking BOND - Brosnan! Ooooh ahhhhh - those baby blues! I liked him and Renee Russo in trhe remake of "The Thomas Crowne Affair" as well ~
completely unrealistic, but what the heyyyyyyy!  :jester:

I tend to favor the Sir Moore films as well as far as story line went (were there any) LOL! Moonraker too, LOL.gif

Bull's Blood it is! A TOAST for you! Muahhhhhhh! devil.gif

Actually James, "The Return of the King" is the third in the trilogy. EAch film is better than its predecessor too (in my opinion). Although the story lines vary slightly from the books, still a very exciting novel turned movie adventure!
Evidently, the director filmed all three movies together, then was tasked with editing at the right moments to end each film.  :sun: WHat countryside, NZ is!I'm in awe just watching the scenery! Yes - it gets confusing though in the way the JRR Tolkien named his characters and places. Souran verses Sarumon (spelling not correct), the Orcs and the Ents. All taken from an old Scandinavian/Celt myth actually and re-written by Tolkien.

Going to see  "Runaway Jury" today , the film adaptation of John Grisham's novel. Should be a good sit spell!  :pharoah2

I'll be sure and bring some treats as we have WAY to many candy left-over from last night! We had 42 tots and teens last night, 65 last year. Go figure? We planned for about 80 kids this year, given that was WARM and clear and our neighborhood has grown. Oh well! And i'm supposed tostart a new diet Monday! LOL.gif  :medusa:
Cheers!
~cleo


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post Nov 1 03, 10:42
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Best looking BOND - Brosnan! Ooooh ahhhhh - those baby blues! I liked him and Renee Russo in the remake of "The Thomas Crowne Affair" as well ~
completely unrealistic, but what the heyyyyyyy!


I’ve seen the TC Affair and, yes, Brosnan was the best thing about it. I take it Brosnan has blue eyes? He’s not a suffocating baby or anything like that? I suppose he is handsome... wonder if he wishes to swap bodies?

I tend to favour the Sir Moore films as well as far as story line went (were there any) LOL! Moonraker too,

“Sir Moore“! I like that.  This knighthood business is odd. It is either Sir Roger or Sir Roger Moore but never Sir Moore. Don’t ask why; the whole thing is lost over a thousand years. We don’t even know the last names of Sir Lancelot or Sir Gwain do we? Anyway, ever since a child I’ve wondered if The Queen is ever tempted to behead anyone when she dubs then a knight (by tapping each shoulder with her sword). Just an anarchic thought of mine.

Any resemblance between James Bond and reality is purely coincidental. It is escapism writ large. That’s why I prefer Moore’s films I think - ever less plausible and more fantastic than Connery’s. So why don't I like mythology and fantasy? Good question.

Bull's Blood it is! A TOAST for you! Muahhhhhhh!

Thank you very much. I sometimes wonder if there are any Hungarians left in Hungary - I am in frequent contact with a Hungarian in Toronto and she has numerous exile friends throughout Canada and the US. Of course those are first generation... seems the pathway is long and broad.

Actually James, "The Return of the King" is the third in the trilogy. EAch film is better than its predecessor too (in my opinion). Although the story lines vary slightly from the books, still a very exciting novel turned movie adventure!
Evidently, the director filmed all three movies together, then was tasked with editing at the right moments to end each film. What countryside, NZ is! I'm in awe just watching the scenery! Yes - it gets confusing though in the way the JRR Tolkien named his characters and places. Souran verses Sarumon (spelling not correct), the Orcs and the Ents. All taken from an old Scandinavian/Celt myth actually and re-written by Tolkien.


JRRT was an eccentric Oxford academic. Oxbridge (that is, Oxford and Cambridge) are England’s top two universities (akin to Yale and Harvard). Oxford is also where Inspector Morse was set and filmed (do you know Morse?) It is about fifty-five miles north of here - I was last there a couple of weeks ago. It is full of academic eccentrics... I just went along in case they needed another.

I find those names (in Economic jargon) a barrier to entry, too. Thanks for the info about the film-splitting; now you mention it I remember that. JRRT wanted to publish the work as one but his publishers required him to split it into smaller parts.

Going to see "Runaway Jury" today , the film adaptation of John Grisham's novel. Should be a good sit spell!

Sit Spell?? Not heard of it - but you’ll have to let us know how it was upon your return.

I'll be sure and bring some treats as we have WAY to many candy left-over from last night! We had 42 tots and teens last night, 65 last year. Go figure? We planned for about 80 kids this year, given that was WARM and clear and our neighbourhood has grown. Oh well! And I'm supposed to start a new diet Monday!

Luckily we never have children knocking on the door for this “Trick/Treat” ritual which we seem to have imported from America. It has taken off (to some degree) here I believe. It spares me being grumpy and unpleasant by opening the door and telling them to return to their parents and not to be so rude as to call begging at someone’s door when they are not impoverished.

Thank you for the sweets offer but I‘ll decline if I may. I’ll join you in a glass of alcohol, though.

Children everywhere... Sounds like hell to me! Do you have children of your own? I don’t; can’t stand them! Dogs first, then adult humans then giant pandas, llamas, aardvarks and so on until one reaches human children. Problem is I spent too many years teaching to ever want my own (though colleagues who are parents always say something like... “I know; other people’s children are little sods but it’s different with your own.” With that sort of recommendation I was never tempted! I remember when I was a child; I would not have wanted to be my parents - and I don’t think I would wish to be a child of mine either. So that seals it... I’ll just have to stop typing and take my three dogs for a walk in the woods.

Diet??? Don’t mention that. The only diet which would have any useful effect on me would be The Knighthood Ceremony diet - keep the head (don’t know why) and discard the severed body... that would mean quite a decent weight loss. I keep trying to lose a few stones but never seem to succeed. Seems Her Majesty is my last hope!

Toodle Pip, J.
 
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