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Cybele



REVISION

HISTORY FOR KIDS

THE GUNPOWDER PLOT

Four hundred years have soon gone by
since nine men, (one of whom was Guy)
secretly planned behind locked doors
to kill King James in the House of Lords.

Thomas Percy, a resourceful fella
had gained permission to hire a cellar,
and on the night of November the Fifth
(if we can sort out  facts from myth)
barrels were taken through the gloom
of narrow corridors to this room.

But Francis Tresham in dismay.
was struck by fear and slipped away  
to warn his friend, the Lord Monteagle
of the deadly plotting; most illegal.
And so it was the beans were spilt,
to try to clear his mind of guilt.

They all escaped the hue and cry -
except for one poor fellow, Guy!
But Fawkes was just a simple man
who fell in with this nasty plan.

First caught, first blamed, justice is blind!
so when you burn him, bear in mind
that Thomas Catesby devised the plan -
and left Guy Fawkes to carry the can.


HISTORY FOR KIDS

THE GUNPOWDER PLOT

Four hundred years have soon gone by
since nine men, (one of whom was Guy)
secretly planned behind locked doors
to kill King James in the House of Lords.

Thomas Percy, a resourceful fella
had gained permission to hire a cellar,
and on the night of November the Fifth
(if we can sort out  facts from myth)

barrels were taken through the gloom
of narrow corridors to this room.
But Francis Tresham had a friend
whom that night, would the Lords attend.

And so it was the beans were spilt,
to try to clear his mind of guilt.
They all escaped the hue and cry
except for one poor fellow, Guy!

But Guy was just a simple man
who fell in with this nasty plan.
First caught, first blamed, justice is blind!
so when you burn him, bear in mind

that Thomas Catesby devised the plan -
so pity Guy Fawkes – if you can.

HOORAY FOR HISTORY!

P.S Guy Fawkes was hanged, drawn and quartered along with three other conspirators who were caught later that night.  Under pain of torture, Guy Fawkes revealed the names of the other conspirators who had left London and agreed to meet at Holbeche House in Staffordshire. News of their hiding place reached the Sheriff of Worcester and on 8th November the house was surrounded by troops. The men refused to surrender and gunfire broke out. Over the next few minutes Thomas Percy, Robert Catesby, Christopher Wright and John Wright were killed.


Link to a great game for children. Search the cellars for the gunpowder and save Parliament!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/games/gunpowder/index.shtml




JLY
Grace,
This was a bit of history that I was not knowledgeable about; found it to be very interesting.  In fact I read if for its enjoyment and not with a discerning eye to make any crits.
I like your style, format, and ideas.  Can't wait for your next historical presentation.
JLY
Cathy
Hi Grace,

This is such a great idea!  History in poem is a much more pleasant way to learn.

Suggestions: use or lose
{omit}[add]

Four hundred years ha[d]{ve} soon gone by
since nine men, (one {of whom was}[named] Guy)
secretly planned[,] behind locked doors
to kill King James in the House of Lords.

Thomas Percy, a resourceful {fella}[feller]
had gained permission to hire a cellar,
and on the night of November the Fifth
(if we can sort out  facts from myth)

barrels were taken through the gloom
of narrow corridors to this room.
But Francis Tresham had a friend
whom that night, would the Lords attend.

And so it was the beans were spilt,
to try to clear his mind of guilt.
They all escaped the hue and cry
except for one poor fellow, Guy!

But Guy was just a simple man
who fell in with this nasty plan.
First caught, first blamed, justice {is} blind!
so when you burn him, bear in mind

{that} Thomas Catesby devised the plan -
so pity Guy Fawkes – if you can.

HOORAY FOR HISTORY!

[Hooray for Grace!!]

Cathy arwen.gif




jgdittier
Dear Grace,
Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery!
See "History for Kids, The Great Chicago Fire"
Cheers,   Ron   jgd
Cybele


Hi Cathy,

QUOTE
This is such a great idea!  History in poem is a much more pleasant way to learn.


I'm glad you think so Cathy but pay attention now, I shall ask questions later and you wouldn't want a detention now, would you?? LOL.gif

Suggestions: use or lose
{omit}[add]

QUOTE
Four hundred years ha[d]{ve} soon gone by
since nine men, (one {of whom was}[named] Guy)
secretly planned[,] behind locked doors
to kill King James in the House of Lords.


I used 'have' Cathy because it is the 400th anniversary next week and I wanted to make it topical. Especially when I read it to the children. They will understand 'have' better than 'had'.

L2 Is correct English over here Cathy ~ and I should know now rofl.gif

QUOTE
Thomas Percy, a resourceful {fella}[feller]
had gained permission to hire a cellar,
and on the night of November the Fifth
(if we can sort out  facts from myth)


Now here, I started out with feller, which can also mean fellow, but is mostly used over here to refer to a tree surgeon of tree feller.


barrels were taken through the gloom
of narrow corridors to this room.
But Francis Tresham had a friend
whom that night, would the Lords attend.

And so it was the beans were spilt,
to try to clear his mind of guilt.
They all escaped the hue and cry
except for one poor fellow, Guy!

QUOTE
But Guy was just a simple man
who fell in with this nasty plan.
First caught, first blamed, justice {is} blind!
so when you burn him, bear in mind


I don't want to minimise this Cathy. Children would be confused if I left out the word 'is'. Also there are eight syllables in each line which keeps the meter pleasant for reading.

QUOTE
{that} Thomas Catesby devised the plan -
so pity Guy Fawkes – if you can.


Same problem here although the meter in these last two lines varies, the word 'that' keeps the flow from the previous stanza. What I should do is put an extra syllable in the last line. Perhaps..

so pity poor Guy Fawkes - if you can.

HOORAY FOR HISTORY!

[Hooray for Grace!!]

Do you think that would work? Thank you for your valued crit my friend.
jgdittier
Dear Grace,
If "Histories for Kids" are to be used for kids, I would assume it would be by a teacher who would explain the concept that the writing of poetry places restrictions on the writer and that as poetry rises above prose in various aspects, it must pay a price. The price is that the reader should accept minor divergences from the strict rules of prose.
There are many poetry lovers today who wonder why poetry apparently is on the decline. One reason may be that the imposition of strict prose requirements on poetry has stolen the sparkle poetry once had.
Were I to read some "History for Kids" to youths, I'd make certain that they understood the gist of the message, but I believe I'd put greater emphasis on recognizing the sheer beauty that verse brings to the message and to be appropriately forgiving.
I think you've initiated a wonderful idea! Were all here who approve of the idea to contribute pieces, we could soon post enough to justify a chapbook perfectly suited as presents to our youthful family, friends and their teachers.
Cheers,    Ron   jgd
Cybele

Hi Ron,  sun.gif


QUOTE
Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery! See "History for Kids, The Great Chicago Fire"


On my way.    bookworm.gif
Nina
Hi Grace

I thought I'd posted a comment here already (must have been in my head only)  :laugh:

Well done for this excellent summary of the Gunpowder Plot, a much more interesting way of learning about it than the dull, dull textbooks we had at school and an easier way of remembering it as well.

barrels were taken through the gloom
of narrow corridors to this room.
But Francis Tresham had a friend
whom that night, would the Lords attend.


my only nit is with the last line which I find quite hard to say though I have no suggestions on how to say it better.

Thanks for the read and onwards to the next history lesson.

Nina
Cybele


Hello again Ron,

QUOTE
If "Histories for Kids" are to be used for kids, I would assume it would be by a teacher who would explain the concept that the writing of poetry places restrictions on the writer and that as poetry rises above prose in various aspects, it must pay a price. The price is that the reader should accept minor divergences from the strict rules of prose.
There are many poetry lovers today who wonder why poetry apparently is on the decline. One reason may be that the imposition of strict prose requirements on poetry has stolen the sparkle poetry once had.


I couldn't agree with you more Ron. Although I attempt to write both, I find that those who do not write R@M generally are not interested in reading it, but having begun my writing in R@M I can appreciate both in different ways because I am still very much on a learning curve as far as prose is concerned. There is, and always should be room for all types of writing.  The only thing I find it slightly hard to reconcile with is minimalism, which is fine for many genres of modern writing, but I do not like to employ it in my own writing as I prefer a gentler flow of words. I suppose that is because I like to read poetry aloud and to my mind, minimalism is much harsher on the ear, as you say it seems to have lost some of its sparkle.


QUOTE
Were I to read some "History for Kids" to youths, I'd make certain that they understood the gist of the message, but I believe I'd put greater emphasis on recognizing the sheer beauty that verse brings to the message and to be appropriately forgiving.


I chose R@M Ron because when you read aloud to children, as I did the other day at the local school, the rhythm and rhyme seem to capture their interest entirely. I also read a bit of blank verse to them and was met with rather blank expressions. I am sure they did not understand it as well as they did the rhyming piece.  This point was made quite plain when they twice asked me to re-read the R@M poetry.

QUOTE
I think you've initiated a wonderful idea! Were all here who approve of the idea to contribute pieces, we could soon post enough to justify a chapbook perfectly suited as presents to our youthful family, friends and their teachers.


I think this is a grand idea Ron. Do you think we could drum up enough interest? Perhaps Lori could let us know what she thinks?
Cybele
Good Morning Nina,  wave.gif
QUOTE
I thought I'd posted a comment here already (must have been in my head only)  


That's more likely my fault for confusing you by using the same title as the last one (subtitled The Great Fire of London which you had critted.  )  dunce.gif

QUOTE
Well done for this excellent summary of the Gunpowder Plot, a much more interesting way of learning about it than the dull, dull textbooks we had at school and an easier way of remembering it as well.



Yes, History in a Nutshell would have been a good alternative name for this series methinks!  laugh.gif  (The nutshell being my head! )


QUOTE
barrels were taken through the gloom
of narrow corridors to this room.
But Francis Tresham had a friend
whom that night, would the Lords attend.

my only nit is with the last line which I find quite hard to say though I have no suggestions on how to say it better.


As usual Nina, you have hit the nail on the head. This is the line that also perturbed me. I have now racked my brains (neither a long or a hard task) and found an alternative which I have posted in the revision. I would appreciate it if you would let me know it it reads better now? detective.gif

QUOTE
Thanks for the read and onwards to the next history lesson.


No, thank you for reading and commenting so nicely. Curstey, curtsey.  blush21.gif




Nina
Hi Grace

I think your revision works really well and the whole poem flows really well now.  The changes improve simplicity as well.

I particularly like the last line now, definitely an inspired change that fits so well with the story.

Nina
Cybele
Hello Nina,

QUOTE
I think your revision works really well and the whole poem flows really well now.  The changes improve simplicity as well.


That's great ~ simplicity is exactly what I am trying to achieve.

QUOTE
I particularly like the last line now, definitely an inspired change that fits so well with the story.


Yes, it suddenly dawned on me that this piece of information was very essential to the telling of the story, since he was indeed the 'Fall Guy' (pause reading here to groan!

Ok after that, I'll slink away quietly.

Mumble, mumble, (sotto voce) well I thought that was quite funny really.  turtle.gif  turtle.gif  turtle.gif  turtle.gif




Cathy
Hi Grace,

I'm glad you think so Cathy but pay attention now, I shall ask questions later and you wouldn't want a detention now, would you??

lol  Oh not detention...please!!  I used to work in the school system as a sub and I would occasionally sit with a roomful of kids in detention.  NOT a pretty site!  lol
Don
You mentioned much earlier that you were going to submit one on Guy Fawkes when the waiting period had expired.  I had fun finding this as I commenced so late.

I am enjoying your and Ron's historical endeavors.  I think the fact that the children's reactions were high to whom you read this says more than I could or would.

Congratulations on expanding history in verse.

I have commemorated a few famous people like Galileo and Thor Heyerdahl in villanelles.

Don
Cybele


Good morning Don,

QUOTE
You mentioned much earlier that you were going to submit one on Guy Fawkes when the waiting period had expired.  I had fun finding this as I commenced so late.

I am enjoying your and Ron's historical endeavors.  I think the fact that the children's reactions were high to whom you read this says more than I could or would.

Congratulations on expanding history in verse.


Thank you for your kind comments Don and I am glad you enjoyed this.

QUOTE
I have commemorated a few famous people like Galileo and Thor Heyerdahl in villanelles.


I have just finished reading Dan Brown's novel Angels and Demons which quite predominantly, mentions Gallileo and Bellini. Gallileo has always fascinated me and I now intend to read more in the hope of bringing a simplified version of the story to the children.

Thor Heyerdahl is another favourite character.

Many years ago on a visit to France and Spain, Ralph and I had reached Santander where we would be picking up the ferry for our return journey, and while strolling along the sea front we came across replicas not only of the Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria but also Heyerdahl's balsa wood Ra. I have photos of these somewhere. The Ra looked so fragile it made the thought of his journey mind-boggling. Such man were either fool-hardy or very brave.

I suppose their equivalent today would be members of those Extreme Sports clubs.

Have your villanelles been posted here on MM Don? I should love to read them.
Don
QUOTE(Cybele @ Nov. 02 2005, 03:07)
[b]

Good morning Don,

QUOTE
I have commemorated a few famous people like Galileo and Thor Heyerdahl in villanelles.


I have just finished reading Dan Brown's novel Angels and Demons which quite predominantly, mentions Gallileo and Bellini. Gallileo has always fascinated me and I now intend to read more in the hope of bringing a simplified version of the story to the children.

Thor Heyerdahl is another favourite character.

Many years ago on a visit to France and Spain, Ralph and I had reached Santander where we would be picking up the ferry for our return journey, and while strolling along the sea front we came across replicas not only of the Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria but also Heyerdahl's balsa wood Ra. I have photos of these somewhere. The Ra looked so fragile it made the thought of his journey mind-boggling. Such man were either fool-hardy or very brave.

I suppose their equivalent today would be members of those Extreme Sports clubs.

Have your villanelles been posted here on MM Don? I should love to read them.

Looking in my records the villanelles mentioned have never been posted at MM.  The one about the famous Italian has considerable comment to aid the poor reader.  Thor was a very insightful intellect.  One can only wonder what social or natural pressures motivated people to attempt long ocean voyages in frail craft.  Of course, our sailing ships like the Nina and Santa Marie were not that much safer.

We can continue to believe they felt protected by their beliefs.  We usually prevail when right is on our side. For sure, those that prevail are right.

I shall try to remember to post those villanelles here at MM.  Thanks for the suggestion.

Don
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