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> CREATIVITY, summary of a New Scientist special featu
Guest_Toumai_*
post Nov 19 05, 03:09
Post #1





Guest






CREATIVITY

What happens in our minds as we write? Why are some people more creative than others? New Scientist (29th October, 2005) had a special section on creativity in the arts and science. It is very well worth reading the full section if you can find it in the library (you don’t have to be a scientist to follow the discussion! ). I have picked a few of the most relevant ideas to summarise here. The original articles cite sources for the most recent and/or accepted research into creative processes.

Looking for Inspiration

Inspiration is hard to explain. We may be aware of the moment of insight, but the ideas may have been incubating for a long time.

Creativity is not the same as intelligence, though intelligence can channel the ideas to good use; creativity is more linked to personality. There are also links to mental illness; changes in mood state may spark a creative burst and some features of schizophrenia are more common in creative types with high scores in lateral, divergent and open thinking. The brains of creative people may be more open to incoming stimuli; not as much information is screened and blocked.

Creativity has two stages: inspiration and elaboration. In the first, while people are dreaming up an idea (a story, for example), the conscious mind is relaxed while the subconscious is making connections. The alpha brain wave activity is similar to that seen in some stages of sleep and relaxation. Once the story has been discovered the conscious brain activity increases to develop it. It seems that creativity depends on the ability to switch between these two states as required.

The brain’s frontal lobes become very active in a situation where complex creative processes are occurring. It is thought that this brain area co-ordinates activity and the flow of ideas. Where there are many possibilities for a story, it helps select the most promising lines: a conscious evaluation of ideas.

The most creative people are aware of their creative potential and make the most of it by using the rhythms of the day, the weekend and holidays to focus. They may work at their desk for a while then go for a walk, because they know that works for them.

Finally, for creativity you need at least one other person in your life who doesn’t think you are completely nuts.

MUSic

In an interview Alex Kapranos (of Franz Ferdinand) explained that there are two different stages of writing a song: an initial creative splurge and then a stage of chopping it about and arranging it. “The best songs come straight out …. You’re trying to control something but you’re not quite sure which direction it’s going … The actual writing …is fairly easy. It feels really exciting. You loose your sense of where you are. But the second process is very ruthless and cold because you have to cut away things that you’re attached to.”

“The Midnight Disease”: hypergraphia

Alice Flaherty, a neurologist, lost premature twins and started writing compulsively. If she were deprived of paper she would write on her own body – anything, so long as she could write.

Such compulsive creativity may be linked to unusual activity in the brain’s temporal lobes. There are links with temporal lobe epilepsy (Dostoevsky syndrome), front-temporal dementia and mood disorders. The behaviour of blocked/depressed people is often similar to those who have frontal lobe injuries. Frontal lobe activity increases in creative people who are actively seeking a creative idea.

“There is mounting evidence that the front-to-back communication between the frontal and the temporal lobes is more important for creativity than the left brain-right brain model of the 1970s.”

Fran




 
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Guest_Jox_*
post Nov 19 05, 04:42
Post #2





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Hi Fran,

Thanks for posting this. I wonder if an old scientist would agree with its thesis?

>F> Inspiration is hard to explain. We may be aware of the moment of insight, but the ideas may have been incubating for a long time.

Rather like death. All those declines starting from birth until one day - bang we're either dead or have a novel.

>F> Creativity is not the same as intelligence, though intelligence can channel the ideas to good use; creativity is more linked to personality.

I'm not sure why anyone should think creativity and intelligence are anything other than potential opposites? Intelligence (at least as we tend to measure it and mean it) is the ability to solve problems. That may be by zeroing-in on a problem (conversion) or by approaching it laterally (diversion - more creative, perhaps). But creativity is starting from "Here" and going in all sorts of new and unexpected directions.

>F> There are also links to mental illness; changes in mood state may spark a creative burst and some features of schizophrenia are more common in creative types with high scores in lateral, divergent and open thinking. The brains of creative people may be more open to incoming stimuli; not as much information is screened and blocked.

Yes. But, conversely, creative people find it harder to zero-in on things. I have heart palpitations when presented with a form to fill in and become very tetchy and panic. (One major reason why I left teaching - all the new bureaucracy).

>F> Creativity has two stages: inspiration and elaboration. In the first, while people are dreaming up an idea (a story, for example), the conscious mind is relaxed while the subconscious is making connections. The alpha brain wave activity is similar to that seen in some stages of sleep and relaxation. Once the story has been discovered the conscious brain activity increases to develop it. It seems that creativity depends on the ability to switch between these two states as required.

I disagree. Of course I can't disagree about Greek brain waves - no idea. But I do disagree that "when people are dreaming-up an idea… the conscious mind is relaxed." I often go through great angst thinking of story lines. I pace up and down, hit the desk, destroy keyboards, throw things out of the window, become very worried etc. my conscious is in big overdrive, struggling. Now, you may say I'm not creative, then - but I am creating so…

However, sometimes ideas do creep-up from the sub-conscious without one trying - I do agree there - but the "professional" writers need to originate ideas deliberately, too.

>F> The brain’s frontal lobes become very active in a situation where complex creative processes are occurring. It is thought that this brain area co-ordinates activity and the flow of ideas. Where there are many possibilities for a story, it helps select the most promising lines: a conscious evaluation of ideas.

OK. Lobes get walking! (cue Nancy Sinatra).

>F> The most creative people are aware of their creative potential and make the most of it by using the rhythms of the day, the weekend and holidays to focus. They may work at their desk for a while then go for a walk, because they know that works for them.

"The most creative people" - woe there! That is a value judgement which I can't let pass. Who decides? I  am suspecting scientists say "this happens - so these are the most creative people." when scientists are the last people who should be deciding. Anyway, too subjective for anyone to proclaim. This is value-judgement passed as fact (one of my major gripes about Science - another being I don't understand it).

I strongly disagree with the rest of the analysis, too. You are talking about disciplined, professional writers - NOT the most creative people. I'm sure people like Geoffrey Archer work that way - and good luck to them. Dylan Thomas (and many more) became / become rat-arsed all day and fall over in bars then try to write a bit. There is much evidence to say the Beatles wrote some of their most original material whilst on drugs. You could, I suppose, argue that is them knowing what works best for them - but it is anything but the tidy, disciplined approach you (the article, of course) suggests.

>F> Finally, for creativity you need at least one other person in your life who doesn’t think you are completely nuts.

Not true at all. Many creative people are "nuts" by ordinary standards. John Clare (the poet) maybe - or Stevie Smith (another poet) or Salvador Dali (painter). All these people were "nuts" by the perverse standards of ordinary society (and you did mention mental illness earlier). Personally, I have given up hoping everyone won't think I am nuts and have decided I am. (Macadamia I think - I like them best) Loving support (no comments about the Jock with a heart, please) is what works best - being accepted. But being thought sane? Who cares about that? No one is really sane - as I told Freddie my Bush Fruit Bat, the other day (He's still in rehab after being shrieked at! :) )

MUSiC

>F>> In an interview Alex Kapranos (of Franz Ferdinand) explained that there are two different stages of writing a song: an initial creative splurge and then a stage of chopping it about and arranging it. “The best songs come straight out …. You’re trying to control something but you’re not quite sure which direction it’s going … The actual writing …is fairly easy. It feels really exciting. You loose your sense of where you are. But the second process is very ruthless and cold because you have to cut away things that you’re attached to.”

FF are a modern British pop band - I only found out recently; I thought it was someone's name.

But that in his approach. Others may vary.

“The Midnight Disease”: hypergraphia

>F> Alice Flaherty, a neurologist, lost premature twins and started writing compulsively. If she were deprived of paper she would write on her own body – anything, so long as she could write.

emm the she was "nuts" also? How could anyone not think that?

>F> Such compulsive creativity may be linked to unusual activity in the brain’s temporal lobes. There are links with temporal lobe epilepsy (Dostoevsky syndrome), front-temporal dementia and mood disorders.

What links?

>F> The behaviour of blocked/depressed people is often similar to those who have frontal lobe injuries. Frontal lobe activity increases in creative people who are actively seeking a creative idea.

What about creative people who are depressed? (Good card players, maybe? ("Fawlty Towers"))

>F> “There is mounting evidence that the front-to-back communication between the frontal and the temporal lobes is more important for creativity than the left brain-right brain model of the 1970s.”

Thank goodness! I haven't even caught up with that.

Thanks for posting this interesting piece Fran (and re-writing it for Science dummies - such as I). However, it fails to address the important question of what creativity is or of how it works in a human sense (I.e. non brain chemical). The quote from Mr Ferdinhand is ok but is very much anecdotal.

Maybe we can all add to this tile by saying how ideas come to us and how we process them into writing - or other arts?

Thanks Fran - great work!

J.
 
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Guest_Nina_*
post Nov 19 05, 05:43
Post #3





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Hi Fran

Thanks for summarising this article for us, most interesting.

>F>Inspiration is hard to explain. We may be aware of the moment of insight, but the ideas may have been incubating for a long time.

in other words they have no idea about how inspiration works.

>F>Creativity is not the same as intelligence, though intelligence can channel the ideas to good use; creativity is more linked to personality. There are also links to mental illness; changes in mood state may spark a creative burst and some features of schizophrenia are more common in creative types with high scores in lateral, divergent and open thinking. The brains of creative people may be more open to incoming stimuli; not as much information is screened and blocked.

What has intelligence got to do with creativity.  I agree that the high in mental illness can spark creativity.  After all hallucinations and hearing voices is very creative.

>J>Yes. But, conversely, creative people find it harder to zero-in on things.

James, you are probably right.  How many very creative people are thought of as eccentric.  Einstein, a brilliant man had problems with practical things like shaving.


>F>Creativity has two stages: inspiration and elaboration. In the first, while people are dreaming up an idea (a story, for example), the conscious mind is relaxed while the subconscious is making connections. The alpha brain wave activity is similar to that seen in some stages of sleep and relaxation. Once the story has been discovered the conscious brain activity increases to develop it. It seems that creativity depends on the ability to switch between these two states as required.

I agree that the subconscious mind is where the inspiration comes from but I don't necessarily think that subconscious and conscious minds are mutually exclusive.  Both can work at the same time.  I find my ideas come when I am either writing or typing.  Take the flash-jams.  I usually have no idea what I'm going to write about when I start.  I begin by consciously describing the stimulus and at the same time my subconscious comes up with the idea.  

When I do the ten word challenges, the conscious act of reading the letters can spark off ideas or just playing around with phrases, putting two words together can give inspiration.

>F>The brain’s frontal lobes become very active in a situation where complex creative processes are occurring. It is thought that this brain area co-ordinates activity and the flow of ideas. Where there are many possibilities for a story, it helps select the most promising lines: a conscious evaluation of ideas.

Now this is interesting.  It is the first time I have read of frontal lobe activity rather than left/right side of the brain.

>F>The most creative people are aware of their creative potential and make the most of it by using the rhythms of the day, the weekend and holidays to focus. They may work at their desk for a while then go for a walk, because they know that works for them.

James, I agree with your comments on this, definitely a value judgement.  I would think that he is talking about controlled creativity, almost forcing yourself to be creative.  The "most creative people" wouldn't need to set themselves into a situation where they can induce creativity.  It would come to them uninivited.  Mind you I reckon those people are all swallowing chemicals to block out that creativity or else are sectioned somewhere.

>F>Finally, for creativity you need at least one other person in your life who doesn’t think you are completely nuts.

why?

MUSic

>F>In an interview Alex Kapranos (of Franz Ferdinand) explained that there are two different stages of writing a song: an initial creative splurge and then a stage of chopping it about and arranging it. “The best songs come straight out …. You’re trying to control something but you’re not quite sure which direction it’s going … The actual writing …is fairly easy. It feels really exciting. You loose your sense of where you are. But the second process is very ruthless and cold because you have to cut away things that you’re attached to.”

That is very true.

“The Midnight Disease”: hypergraphia

>F>Alice Flaherty, a neurologist, lost premature twins and started writing compulsively. If she were deprived of paper she would write on her own body – anything, so long as she could write.

now that is mania/mental illness

>F>Such compulsive creativity may be linked to unusual activity in the brain’s temporal lobes. There are links with temporal lobe epilepsy (Dostoevsky syndrome), front-temporal dementia and mood disorders. The behaviour of blocked/depressed people is often similar to those who have frontal lobe injuries. Frontal lobe activity increases in creative people who are actively seeking a creative idea.

I think this is an interesting possibility which could if proved maybe lead to better treatment for mental illness.  Could one stimulate frontal lobe activity in some one who is very depressed and bring them out of depression.  Alternatively could one somehow calm down frontal lobe activity on someone who is manic in order to stabalise them.  

“There is mounting evidence that the front-to-back communication between the frontal and the temporal lobes is more important for creativity than the left brain-right brain model of the 1970s.”
 
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Guest_Toumai_*
post Feb 3 06, 11:35
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Hello, James

You may have thought I'd forgotten this, but I am back at long last. Apologies for the delay.

Thanks for posting this. I wonder if an old scientist would agree with its thesis?

>F> Inspiration is hard to explain. We may be aware of the moment of insight, but the ideas may have been incubating for a long time.

Rather like death. All those declines starting from birth until one day - bang we're either dead or have a novel.


That explains several reviews I've read recently

>F> Creativity is not the same as intelligence, though intelligence can channel the ideas to good use; creativity is more linked to personality.

I'm not sure why anyone should think creativity and intelligence are anything other than potential opposites? Intelligence (at least as we tend to measure it and mean it) is the ability to solve problems. That may be by zeroing-in on a problem (conversion) or by approaching it laterally (diversion - more creative, perhaps). But creativity is starting from "Here" and going in all sorts of new and unexpected directions.


So you're agreeing? (*faints*)

>F> There are also links to mental illness; changes in mood state may spark a creative burst and some features of schizophrenia are more common in creative types with high scores in lateral, divergent and open thinking. The brains of creative people may be more open to incoming stimuli; not as much information is screened and blocked.

Yes. But, conversely, creative people find it harder to zero-in on things. I have heart palpitations when presented with a form to fill in and become very tetchy and panic. (One major reason why I left teaching - all the new bureaucracy).


I think forms affect many people like that. I can zero in on many things (even dreaded stats) perfectly well as a scientist, but some forms still turn me into a nervous wreck.

>F> Creativity has two stages: inspiration and elaboration. In the first, while people are dreaming up an idea (a story, for example), the conscious mind is relaxed while the subconscious is making connections. The alpha brain wave activity is similar to that seen in some stages of sleep and relaxation. Once the story has been discovered the conscious brain activity increases to develop it. It seems that creativity depends on the ability to switch between these two states as required.

I disagree. Of course I can't disagree about Greek brain waves - no idea. But I do disagree that "when people are dreaming-up an idea… the conscious mind is relaxed." I often go through great angst thinking of story lines. I pace up and down, hit the desk, destroy keyboards, throw things out of the window, become very worried etc. my conscious is in big overdrive, struggling. Now, you may say I'm not creative, then - but I am creating so…


However, sometimes ideas do creep-up from the sub-conscious without one trying - I do agree there - but the "professional" writers need to originate ideas deliberately, too.

Yes, but expert writers may have learned that by pacing, thumping computers or whatever (lol) they can elicit the correct brain state deliberately - push themselves into creative mode. I know I am now more receptive to my day dreams when I am writing a novel - they are not merely somethign to pass the time but something to be relished; they help me get to know the characters.

>F> The brain’s frontal lobes become very active in a situation where complex creative processes are occurring. It is thought that this brain area co-ordinates activity and the flow of ideas. Where there are many possibilities for a story, it helps select the most promising lines: a conscious evaluation of ideas.

OK. Lobes get walking! (cue Nancy Sinatra).


LOL

>F> The most creative people are aware of their creative potential and make the most of it by using the rhythms of the day, the weekend and holidays to focus. They may work at their desk for a while then go for a walk, because they know that works for them.

"The most creative people" - woe there! That is a value judgement which I can't let pass. Who decides? I  am suspecting scientists say "this happens - so these are the most creative people." when scientists are the last people who should be deciding. Anyway, too subjective for anyone to proclaim. This is value-judgement passed as fact (one of my major gripes about Science - another being I don't understand it).


The most creative people I didn't take to be a value judgment by scientists per se. If I wanted to find creative people I'd ask them how creative they feel they are and are they aware of any differences in creativity thru the day/night. The point is that we work better at certain parts of the day than others; for example, I am a morning person: my best writing time is before lunch. By 10pm I cannot write anything new that makes sense.

I strongly disagree with the rest of the analysis, too. You are talking about disciplined, professional writers - NOT the most creative people. I'm sure people like Geoffrey Archer work that way - and good luck to them. Dylan Thomas (and many more) became / become rat-arsed all day and fall over in bars then try to write a bit. There is much evidence to say the Beatles wrote some of their most original material whilst on drugs. You could, I suppose, argue that is them knowing what works best for them - but it is anything but the tidy, disciplined approach you (the article, of course) suggests.

I think the article is concentrating on the creative process as a natural phenomenen and not any artificial enhancements. Anyway, plenty of people have been very creative without being alcoholics or junkies, and substance abuse/adiction does not make most users creative - indeed, quite the reverse.

>F> Finally, for creativity you need at least one other person in your life who doesn’t think you are completely nuts.

Not true at all. Many creative people are "nuts" by ordinary standards. John Clare (the poet) maybe - or Stevie Smith (another poet) or Salvador Dali (painter). All these people were "nuts" by the perverse standards of ordinary society (and you did mention mental illness earlier). Personally, I have given up hoping everyone won't think I am nuts and have decided I am. (Macadamia I think - I like them best) Loving support (no comments about the Jock with a heart, please) is what works best - being accepted. But being thought sane? Who cares about that? No one is really sane - as I told Freddie my Bush Fruit Bat, the other day (He's still in rehab after being shrieked at! :) )


Ah, but Mischa and Lyric don't care, do they? I think that is the gist (though I thought that comment a bit extraneous, too).

MUSiC

>F>> In an interview Alex Kapranos (of Franz Ferdinand) explained that there are two different stages of writing a song: an initial creative splurge and then a stage of chopping it about and arranging it. “The best songs come straight out …. You’re trying to control something but you’re not quite sure which direction it’s going … The actual writing …is fairly easy. It feels really exciting. You loose your sense of where you are. But the second process is very ruthless and cold because you have to cut away things that you’re attached to.”


FF are a modern British pop band - I only found out recently; I thought it was someone's name.

But that in his approach. Others may vary.


Yes, that was simply annecdotal. From reading on MM, WD and the defunct GW there are as many ways to write as there are writers. A comforting thought and one reason why I dislike "how to write" books and courses. The best way to write is to ... erm ... write; practice and practice.

“The Midnight Disease”: hypergraphia

>F> Alice Flaherty, a neurologist, lost premature twins and started writing compulsively. If she were deprived of paper she would write on her own body – anything, so long as she could write
.

emm the she was "nuts" also? How could anyone not think that?


There are worse ways to be a little peculiar

>F> Such compulsive creativity may be linked to unusual activity in the brain’s temporal lobes. There are links with temporal lobe epilepsy (Dostoevsky syndrome), front-temporal dementia and mood disorders.

What links?


Correlational studies (I suspect, though I don't have this mag anymore, sorry); so a higher number of people have two or more of these syndromes than would be expected by their individual frequency in the population.

>F> The behaviour of blocked/depressed people is often similar to those who have frontal lobe injuries. Frontal lobe activity increases in creative people who are actively seeking a creative idea.

What about creative people who are depressed? (Good card players, maybe? ("Fawlty Towers"))


No idea, sorry (LOL)

>F> “There is mounting evidence that the front-to-back communication between the frontal and the temporal lobes is more important for creativity than the left brain-right brain model of the 1970s.”

Thank goodness! I haven't even caught up with that.


It is still widely quoted in creative teaching; hence I hoped this might update the ideas.

Thanks for posting this interesting piece Fran (and re-writing it for Science dummies - such as I). However, it fails to address the important question of what creativity is or of how it works in a human sense (I.e. non brain chemical). The quote from Mr Ferdinhand is ok but is very much anecdotal.

Maybe we can all add to this tile by saying how ideas come to us and how we process them into writing - or other arts?


But James, you KNOW how creativity works in a human sense - you must do: you are one of the most creative people I know.

This research merely attempts to link what we feel as writers as we create to what is happening inside our brains as we do it.

Yes, the Kapranos quote was a "real person" anecdotal interview interspersed with the dry science.

Please do all add your own comments on how you feel you create things - it would be most interesting indeed.

Thanks

Fran
 
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Guest_Jox_*
post Feb 3 06, 11:40
Post #5





Guest






Hi Fran - forgotten! Nov-Feb? - No I thought you were busy making the tea! :)

>F> But James, you KNOW how creativity works in a human sense - you must do: you are one of the most creative people I know.

Thank you - very flattering! :)

But even if I am creative, how does that let me know how it works? I walk but i have no idea how. I have a theory that micro koi carp push wheelbarrows of ballast up one leg and down t'other, thus forming a walking movement. The only problem is that, when we cut legs up we can't find them. But I can't see any other valid explanation either.

So, sorry I really don't know at all.

As regards M&L - you said "at least one other person" - they are dogs. (Thank goodness; every human I do know things me quite bonkers).

Substance abuse - virtually all creative people seem to need some, be it tea or coffee or fags or booze or wacky-backy or essence of fruit bat.

To Nina: bed at 4 in the morning (well, maybe not in this weather) if one comes to mind then.

eh? That sound bonkers - I'm just going to bed then! :)

OK.. Let's dance... you put your frontal lobe in, your right hand out and so the flash-jam. oooh the creativity! Nope I'm sure it is about those kois migrating too far north and flooding the brain with new thoughts. I think I'm turning Japanese... I really think so!

I'll keep adding bits.

Thanks for your reply!

J.




 
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Guest_Toumai_*
post Feb 3 06, 11:55
Post #6





Guest






Hi Nina

Thanks for summarising this article for us, most interesting.

You're welcome; thanks for joining in and commenting

>F>Inspiration is hard to explain. We may be aware of the moment of insight, but the ideas may have been incubating for a long time.

in other words they have no idea about how inspiration works.


LOL

>F>Creativity is not the same as intelligence, though intelligence can channel the ideas to good use; creativity is more linked to personality. There are also links to mental illness; changes in mood state may spark a creative burst and some features of schizophrenia are more common in creative types with high scores in lateral, divergent and open thinking. The brains of creative people may be more open to incoming stimuli; not as much information is screened and blocked.

What has intelligence got to do with creativity.  I agree that the high in mental illness can spark creativity.  After all hallucinations and hearing voices is very creative.


Yes, "visulisation" (which I will admit to) is not that far off from visions. The only difference is the awareness that it is internal and self-generated - and an element of control.

>J>Yes. But, conversely, creative people find it harder to zero-in on things.

James, you are probably right.  How many very creative people are thought of as eccentric.  Einstein, a brilliant man had problems with practical things like shaving
.

The original absent-minded scientist, LOL

>F>Creativity has two stages: inspiration and elaboration. In the first, while people are dreaming up an idea (a story, for example), the conscious mind is relaxed while the subconscious is making connections. The alpha brain wave activity is similar to that seen in some stages of sleep and relaxation. Once the story has been discovered the conscious brain activity increases to develop it. It seems that creativity depends on the ability to switch between these two states as required.

I agree that the subconscious mind is where the inspiration comes from but I don't necessarily think that subconscious and conscious minds are mutually exclusive.  Both can work at the same time.  I find my ideas come when I am either writing or typing.  Take the flash-jams.  I usually have no idea what I'm going to write about when I start.  I begin by consciously describing the stimulus and at the same time my subconscious comes up with the idea.  

When I do the ten word challenges, the conscious act of reading the letters can spark off ideas or just playing around with phrases, putting two words together can give inspiration.


I'd agree; and having read or watched interviews with quite a few writers now I think that the switching can be very speedy indeed (microseconds) - and of course, there is no awareness of the switches. I was very disapointed the first time I did a flash session - I'd been warned it would be an intense experience and my creativity would feel different; but since I'm used to meditating and have written for ages it didn't register as anything new ... c'est la vie.

>F>The brain’s frontal lobes become very active in a situation where complex creative processes are occurring. It is thought that this brain area co-ordinates activity and the flow of ideas. Where there are many possibilities for a story, it helps select the most promising lines: a conscious evaluation of ideas.

Now this is interesting.  It is the first time I have read of frontal lobe activity rather than left/right side of the brain.


Me too.
So now we can sound like we're really up to date with psych research next time someone mentions L/R effects wink.gif

>F>The most creative people are aware of their creative potential and make the most of it by using the rhythms of the day, the weekend and holidays to focus. They may work at their desk for a while then go for a walk, because they know that works for them.

James, I agree with your comments on this, definitely a value judgement.  I would think that he is talking about controlled creativity, almost forcing yourself to be creative.  The "most creative people" wouldn't need to set themselves into a situation where they can induce creativity.  It would come to them uninivited.  Mind you I reckon those people are all swallowing chemicals to block out that creativity or else are sectioned somewhere.


Hey, but if people take drugs to enhance that spark - to really push it to the max - why not use the body's natural inclinations? I know there's no point in trying to start a poem at bedtime but I'll leap out of bed at 4 in the morning (well, maybe not in this weather) if one comes to mind then.

>F>Finally, for creativity you need at least one other person in your life who doesn’t think you are completely nuts.

why?


We all need some kind of support and encouragement. Why do so many of us join web sites? Cos its less lonely (and we can swap tips).

MUSic

>F>In an interview Alex Kapranos (of Franz Ferdinand) explained that there are two different stages of writing a song: an initial creative splurge and then a stage of chopping it about and arranging it. “The best songs come straight out …. You’re trying to control something but you’re not quite sure which direction it’s going … The actual writing …is fairly easy. It feels really exciting. You loose your sense of where you are. But the second process is very ruthless and cold because you have to cut away things that you’re attached to.”


That is very true.


Do you ever forget to get off your bus at the right stop?

“The Midnight Disease”: hypergraphia

>F>Alice Flaherty, a neurologist, lost premature twins and started writing compulsively. If she were deprived of paper she would write on her own body – anything, so long as she could write.


now that is mania/mental illness


Certainly a form of, yes.

>F>Such compulsive creativity may be linked to unusual activity in the brain’s temporal lobes. There are links with temporal lobe epilepsy (Dostoevsky syndrome), front-temporal dementia and mood disorders. The behaviour of blocked/depressed people is often similar to those who have frontal lobe injuries. Frontal lobe activity increases in creative people who are actively seeking a creative idea.

I think this is an interesting possibility which could if proved maybe lead to better treatment for mental illness.  Could one stimulate frontal lobe activity in some one who is very depressed and bring them out of depression.  Alternatively could one somehow calm down frontal lobe activity on someone who is manic in order to stabalise them.


I would guess that "they" are working on such things; the problem is how to target certain areas in the brain very specifically as it is so hard to get into without side effects.

Thanks so much Nina.

Fran
 
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Guest_Nina_*
post Feb 3 06, 12:07
Post #7





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Hi Fran

>F>In an interview Alex Kapranos (of Franz Ferdinand) explained that there are two different stages of writing a song: an initial creative splurge and then a stage of chopping it about and arranging it. “The best songs come straight out …. You’re trying to control something but you’re not quite sure which direction it’s going … The actual writing …is fairly easy. It feels really exciting. You loose your sense of where you are. But the second process is very ruthless and cold because you have to cut away things that you’re attached to.”

That is very true.

>F>Do you ever forget to get off your bus at the right stop?

yep, did that yesterday.  Completely lost my bearings.  Luckily I realised it at the bus-stop I should have got off at  so could get off at the next one which wasn't much further along. Made a mental note to self not to start something on a short bus ride.  

Nina
 
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